Quantum Key Distribution and Quantum-Safe Cryptography: two (complementary) approaches to becoming quantum-ready : Government

Every advancement in quantum computing brings us closer to the positive and negative disruptions this revolutionary technology promises. Though a large-scale quantum computer is not here yet, its future arrival already puts many aspects of information security at risk today because of “harvest-and-decrypt” attacks, for example, where adversaries collect and store encrypted data with the intention of decrypting it in the future.

Now, business leaders recognize that they need to start preparing and are asking how they can become ‘quantum-ready.’

For security leaders, protecting your organization’s critical assets, products and confidential data using a quantum-safe method is essential. We will discuss two such approaches: quantum-safe cryptography and quantum key distribution.

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When it comes to quantum computing becoming a mainstream technology, it is becoming clear that industry, government and academia must work together to reap the full benefits of this emerging technology. At the Hudson Institute’s “The Quantum Revolution and Intellectual Property: Advancing and Protecting America’s Innovative Edge” on Wednesday, September 12th, ISARA’s Martin Laforest, Senior […]

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Federal governments realize the important role they play in preparing for both the positive and negative disruption that large-scale quantum computing will bring with it. However, as other emerging technologies are rolled out, such as cloud computing, incorporating quantum-safe security from the outset is essential. In this article, Thomas Keelan, a research associate at the […]

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Global Leader in Quantum-Safe Security Presents How Crypto-Agility Helps Organizations Integrate Encryption Resistant to Quantum Attack Today WASHINGTON, D.C. and WATERLOO, Ontario (September 5, 2018) – ISARA Corp., the world’s leading provider of quantum-safe security solutions, will present the importance of crypto-agility and how organizations can prepare today for the looming threat quantum computing poses […]

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With increased investments in quantum technology by nation states such as China and Russia, the heat is on for the United States to start taking quantum seriously. Several bills have been proposed to fund quantum research and development in the private sector and academia. Winning the quantum race will require collaboration between allied nations, academia and the private sector.

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The following is an excerpt from a contributed opinion piece on Journal of Cyber Policy by Scott Totzke, CEO & Co-founder of ISARA Corporation.

The dawn of the quantum computing era promises to fundamentally change the way we approach big problems – from researching cures for cancer to alleviating traffic in urban centers. But – and this is a very significant but –  large-scale quantum computing also has the potential to create catastrophic problems if we don’t take steps now to ensure that data such as financial transactions, medical histories and government records are protected with quantum-safe encryption.

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On The CyberWire Daily Podcast, Scott Totzke, CEO & Co-founder of ISARA Corporation, discusses the threat that quantum computing poses to encrypted data. To listen, please visit The CyberWire.    

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US Representative Will Hurd compares the Nuclear Age to the Quantum Age to make clear the power that this age of computing will bring. He describes the severity of attacks by individual hackers and emphasizes the how much greater the impact will

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What is a cryptographic certificate?
Cryptographic certificates are used to prove a person’s, system’s, company’s or other entity’s identity. Today, cryptographic certificates are based on public key cryptography, and are also known as a “digital certificate” or “identify certificate”, which is an electronic document whose contents can prove the ownership of a piece of information called the “public key”. A certificate functions somewhat like a passport or identity card, in that the counterparty can be reasonably assured of the person holding the certificate’s true identity. This assurance is achieved through the use of a cryptographic function, which is a mathematical operation, the results of which validate the identity of the certificate holder.

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Since the 1970s, the technology industry has built a trust system rooted in public key cryptography which allows our transactions and communications to be properly authenticated. But within a decade, a large-scale quantum computer will break this system requiring a seamless (and “great”) migration to the next-generation of cybersecurity: quantum-safe cryptography.

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